Book Review: Farm Block, Christopher Franceschelli

Farm Block
Author: Christopher Franceschelli
Illustrator: Peskimo
Publisher: Abrams Appleseed
Ages: The Littlest Littles (3 and up)
Genre: Board Book

Concept books and board books have come a long way since I was a kiddo (yes, we had dinosaurs for pets then, thanks for asking), and this book perfectly sums up all that is new and fun about this style. Farm Block is the latest addition to the Block Book series, a fabulous collection of chunky books that littles will love to hold and explore. I should add—don’t rule this book out for kids older than preschoolers, too!

Farm Block tells a story of seasons on a farm—exploring and helping with farm chores (counting chickens, feeding goats, and picking apples the way). As the seasons pass, apples are picked, pumpkins are carved, firewood is chopped, and marshmallows are roasted by the fire. Spring comes, and planting begins, time passes, and off to the farmer’s market we go!

First, I was surprised at how LONG this book is. 92 pages of unfolding, die-cuts, gatefolds, and illustration-packed pages. And while the littlest littles may have short attention spans, it means this book grows with your kiddo. Preschoolers will love exploring what’s behind all those flaps, kindergarteners will enjoy hearing the story as a read-aloud, and older kids will enjoy reading along with the simple sentences. The narrative introduces concepts of passing seasons, growing and harvesting crops, and selling the produce at market. This might be relatable for some children and is also a great way to introduce “city dwellers” to where their food comes from.

Boxy, eye-capturing, bright illustrations are attention grabbing and happy. Cheerful depictions of farm chores start building an appreciation for the importance of teamwork. Flaps and fold-outs with “sneak peeks” will prompt inquiring little minds to explore what’s beneath the soil and behind barn doors.

Second, this book is timeless and a sweet gift for any time of the year. A fantastic way to celebrate the importance of farmers and the essential work they do for our communities.

Many thanks to Abrams for providing a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

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